News

  • Researchers observed the unfolding of telomere G-quadruplex structures using a combination of single-molecule FRET and magnetic tweezers, as shown in this diagram. (Artwork by Benjamin Akiyama)
    Thursday, January 17, 2013
    Chromosome-capping telomeres are a potential target for anti-cancer drugs
  • Susan Strome, winner of the Ellison Medical Foundation grant
    Tuesday, November 27, 2012
    Her studies of development and immortality in germline cells earned her this prestigious four-year award for aging research
  • With a citation score of 99.9, UC Santa Cruz has the same score as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Friday, October 5, 2012
    In overall rankings by subject, UCSC was among the top 50 universities in the physical sciences
  • Chromosomes labeled with green fluorescent protein are about to separate in this frame from a movie of dividing cells at the surface of a fly embryo. With adaptive optics for deep-tissue imaging, biologist William Sullivan hopes to extend his observations
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011
    $1 million grant from W. M. Keck Foundation funds Center for Adaptive Optical Microscopy at UC Santa Cruz
  • David Haussler (photo by R. Jones)
    Tuesday, June 14, 2011
    David Haussler, professor of biomolecular engineering, has been chosen to receive the 2011 Weldon Memorial Prize given by the University of Oxford.
  • Specific bone marrow niches are critical for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function during both normal hematopoiesis and in stem cell transplantation therapy. The guidance receptor Robo4 cooperates with Cxcr4 to specify HSC location to bone marrow niches.
    Thursday, January 6, 2011
    Researchers in the Forsberg lab have identified a key molecule for establishing blood stem cells in their niche within the bone marrow.
  • Data produced by FragSeq are superimposed onto an RNA structure. FragSeq analysis allows rapid, efficient probing and comparison of hundreds of RNAs in a single experiment, analyzing the results in a genomic context.
    Monday, November 22, 2010
    A new technology for ribonucleic acid (RNA) structure detection developed at the University of California, Santa Cruz, combines test tube RNA biochemistry, high-throughput sequencing, and computational biology to shine new light on the structure and function of these versatile molecules.
  • Amy Ralston
    Monday, August 16, 2010
    The Ellison Medical Foundation has selected MCD biologist Amy Ralston as a New Scholar in Aging, providing $400,000 over four years to support her research on the biology of stem cells.
  • Splicing factor and CUG-RNA repeat
    Monday, January 25, 2010
    A study shows that the loss of a single protein accounts for most of the molecular abnormalities associated with the disease, while loss of a second protein also seems to play an important role.
  • Graduate student Courtney Onodera uses mouse embryonic stem cells to study regulatory elements of the genome in the Haussler Lab. Photo by B. Wagman.
    Thursday, February 26, 2009
    Where do blood cells come from? How do neurons develop to create the complex wiring of the brain? Can we build a better microscope to study living cells?
  • Anne Royou, UCSC CIRM Postdoctoral Scholar
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009
    The governing board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) last week approved a $2.2 million grant to the University of California, Santa Cruz, to fund a training program in stem cell research. With this grant, the CIRM funding awarded to UCSC now totals $19.4 million from nine grants, all managed by the campus's Center for Biomolecular Science and Engineering (CBSE).
  • Wednesday, May 7, 2008
    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved a $7.2 million grant to fund a new stem cell research center at the University of California, Santa Cruz. The center will house an interdisciplinary program involving faculty from five departments at UCSC and collaborators at other institutions.
  • Graduate student Courtney Onodera employs mouse embryonic stem cells to explore the functions of the ultraconserved DNA in the human genome. Working in the Haussler laboratory, she combines computational with laboratory methods to find motifs of behavior
    Thursday, January 31, 2008
    The UCSC Training Program in Systems Biology of Stem Cells is sponsored by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), established in early 2005 with the passage of Proposition 71, the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative. Courtney Onodera, a graduate student in the laboratory of biomolecular engineering professor David Haussler, is among the first set of scholars chosen for the UCSC program in July 2006. This story is one of a series of spotlights on the research conducted by these scholars.
  • Bin Chen and Camilla Forsberg received CIRM New Faculty Awards for stem cell research. Photo by Tim Stephens
    Thursday, December 13, 2007
    Two young UCSC faculty members have received major grants for stem cell research from the California Insitute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). The five-year grants totalling $4.5 million will support the research of Bin Chen, assistant professor of molecular, cell, and develomental biology, and Camilla Forsberg, assistant professor of biomolecular engineering.
  • Postdoc Hema Vayadanathan feeds the mouse embryonic stem cell culture used in her research on the effects of ephrin signaling on cell development. Photo by Branwyn Wagman
    Thursday, December 6, 2007
    The UCSC Training Program in Systems Biology of Stem Cells is sponsored by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), established in early 2005 with the passage of Proposition 71, the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative. Hema Vayadanathan is among the first set of scholars chosen for the UCSC program in July 2006. This story is one of a series of spotlights on the research conducted by these scholars.
  • P19 embryonic carcinoma cells - Roland Nagel
    Thursday, June 7, 2007
    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved a $2.7 million grant to fund a stem cell research facility at the University of California, Santa Cruz. The facility will be shared by UCSC researchers using human embryonic stem cells in efforts that may ultimately lead to new therapies for conditions ranging from Parkinson's disease to birth defects.
  • UCSC stem cell training program predoctoral scholar, Photo by Branwyn Wagman
    Monday, April 9, 2007
    The UCSC Training Program in Systems Biology of Stem Cells is sponsored by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), established in early 2005 with the passage of Proposition 71, the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative. The first set of scholars chosen for the UCSC program started in July 2006. This story is one of a series of spotlights on the research conducted by these scholars.
  • The work of Bin Chen, left, and David Feldheim, assistant professors of molecular, cell, and developmental biology, represent important steps in the exploration of whether cell replacement could be an effective treatment for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
    Monday, March 5, 2007
    UCSC has received $1 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to fund human embryonic stem cell research.
  • Anne Royou at work dissecting drosophila ovaries. Photo: Branwyn Wagman
    Friday, January 12, 2007
    The UCSC Training Program in Systems Biology of Stem Cells is sponsored by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), established in early 2005 with the passage of Proposition 71, the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative. The California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research (QB3) has augmented the UCSC program by funding an additional scholar. The first set of scholars chosen for the UCSC program started in July 2006. This story begins a series of spotlights on the research conducted by these scholars.
  • Carcinoma cells formed from mouse embryonic stem cells, Roland Nagel
    Monday, April 10, 2006
    UC Santa Cruz, has received $375,000 from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to fund the first year of a new training program in stem cell research. CIRM announced today that it has distributed $12.1 million in grants to 16 California institutions as part of the CIRM Training Program.
  • Differentiating mouse myoblast cells--muscle myotubule formation, Roland Nagel, UCSC
    Thursday, September 15, 2005
    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) last week announced its first grant awards, including a $1.2 million training grant to the University of California, Santa Cruz, to establish a new training program in the systems biology of stem cells.
  • Monday, January 1, 2001
    TBA

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